Army Capt. Chris Fogt: The Workout: Training to Bobsled

Army Capt. Chris Fogt: The Workout: Training to Bobsled

Via http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/05/the-workout-training-to-bobsled/?_r=0

  • “Being an Olympic bobsledder is a job that requires a precise balance of speed, muscle and weight. The athletes must explode off the starting line while pushing nearly 500 pounds of bobsled at full speed. They need to be strong enough for a powerful launch so the sled will reach speeds exceeding 90 miles an hour. But the athletes also need to be lean in order to lighten the load and wind resistance as they hunker down in the sled.”
  • Bobsledding is a very physical sport. It requires a lot of speed and power.
  • That’s because it’s a hybrid of the sports. We lift three to four times a week, we sprint twice a week, and we push the sled out here twice a week.
  • Every athlete has their own program, but a few of the constants will be power cleans, squats, jumps, and deadlifts.
  • If you’re leaner and smaller and flexible, you can get real low and that helps the air flow right over the sled. We want to be strong but lean and mean.
  • Most guys in our sport weigh between 215 and 235 pounds. That’s the sweet spot. If you get much larger than that, it’s hard to have the speed to push the bobsled. And if you’re smaller than that, you don’t have the power to push the bobsled.
  • We try to eat a lot of protein and a lot of carbs. I try and consume about 5,000 calories a day.
  • While we’re in the bobsled we try not to move as much as we can. That’s very hard because we hit around 4 to 5 G’s.
  • We’ve had races where it’s been minus 30. So right before the race you’re trying to get warm and not pull any muscles. You have to learn how to feel light and fast while you’re freezing.
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